9 Differences Between Tokyo Disneyland and Disneyland Park

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If you’re a Disney fan, chances are, you’ve gone to Disneyland Park. But what about Tokyo Disneyland? Despite being on the small side, it’s jam-packed with plenty of fun attractions. As you can expect from something that’s halfway across the world, though, it’s different in several ways.

Let’s take a look at these differences!

1. The Space Mountain in Tokyo Disneyland Has No Music

In Tokyo, you ride through Space Mountain in silence. Unlike the ones at the other parks, there is no galactic music whatsoever. This might seem weird, especially if you’re used to the sounded version. Interestingly enough, though, you don’t notice it too much when you’re holding on for dear life!

2. Tokyo Disneyland has a Unique Ride Called Monsters, Inc. Ride & Go Seek

If you’re a fan of Monsters, Inc., you’ll definitely want to check out Tokyo Disneyland’s Ride & Go Seek ride. Unique to Japan, this dark attraction is similar to Buzz’s Astroblasters in that it is somewhat of an interactive game. Ultimately, the goal is to find as many monsters as possible by “tagging” them with a special flashlight. It might seem a little childish, but it’s actually quite fun!

3. Tokyo Disneyland is Not Owned by the Walt Disney Company

Despite being near clones of each other, Tokyo Disneyland and Disneyland Park are owned by two separate companies. More specifically, the former is owned by The Oriental Land Company, a Japanese company that pays Disney for the right to use their characters.

Now you might be wondering—”How are the attractions so similar?” The truth is, Disney had sent several of their Imagineers over to Japan to design and build the parks at the Tokyo resort.

4. Tokyo Disneyland Has a Trackless Winnie the Pooh Ride

Pooh’s Hunny Hunt is a dark ride that is unique to Tokyo. Unlike the Winnie the Pooh attractions at the other parks, it features a trackless system. One of the greatest highlights of this is that it sends riders on random paths. Sure, you’ll see the same audio animatronics, but the experience will be different every time! Does it surprise you that something like this cost over $130 million to build?

5. A Beauty and Beast Ride is Coming to Tokyo Disneyland in 2020


Last year, it was announced that Tokyo Disneyland would be adding a new Beauty and the Beast attraction to the park. Being built as we speak, the ride will feature some of the most advanced animatronics, all of which are programmed using animation from the original 1991 film. You can take a sneak peek in the video above!

6. There are Unique Foods That You Can Only Eat in Tokyo Disneyland

The food choices in Japan are crazy (and we mean that in a good way). Where else would you be able to eat Mouse Glove sandwiches, soy sauce popcorn, and Dark Vader rice cakes? Really, you can’t compare the food at Tokyo Disneyland to the ones in Disneyland Park. Even their turkey legs taste yummier! Here’s a tip from us—bring lots of cash.

7. You can buy an After 6 Passport for Nearly Half Price at Tokyo Disney Land

Unlike Disneyland Park, where you only have the option of purchasing day passes, Tokyo Disneyland offers After 6 Passports, a special type of ticket that allows you to visit the park in the evening. While you might not be able to do as much in a few hours, many of the rides will have shorter wait times as the park will be emptier.

8. Main Street is Undercover in Tokyo Disneyland

For one thing, Main Street, U.S.A. is called the World Bazaar in Tokyo. Perhaps the greatest difference, though, is the fact that there is a glass roof. Not only does it make for a cool atmosphere, but it also shields you from the summer heat! As you can expect, they also sell a variety of unique merchandise at the different stores

9. Guests Tend to Dress Up for the Occasion in Tokyo Disneyland


Japanese guests tend to take Disney more seriously compared to their American counterparts. For instance, it’s not uncommon to see couples or groups wearing the same outfits at the park. At one point, you might even ask yourself—”where did they get all of the costumes?.” In the end, it’s part of the entire experience.

 

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